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Accusations fly as Miss Scarlet (Katie Winkler) faces off with the other miscreant characters
of ‘Clue’ during a rehearsal for the ACHS production of the play based on the 1985 film,
premiering to the public at 7:30 p.m. this Thursday, Nov. 15, at the ACHS minitheater.
Photo by Matthew Hundley



Originally published: 2012-11-15 10:42:29
Last modified: 2012-11-15 10:42:29

ACHS presents ‘Clue’ Thursday to Sunday

Matthew Hundley / (matthew.hundley@averyjournal.com)

Enjoy the classic board game “Clue” like never before by playing along with the 45 students contributing to the ACHS drama club’s fall production of the play inspired by the classic whodunit mystery-style game. 

ACHS’s production of “Clue,” based on the script of the 1985 film starring Tim Curry, will be open to the public at 7:30 p.m. this Thursday, Friday and Saturday, Nov. 15,16 and 17, and at 2:30 p.m. this Sunday, Nov. 18. Admission for the play is $5 for adults and $3 for students and children. 

Though admission is the same for each showing, audiences may not come away with the same story, as the ending of each night’s performance may change, offering the audience the opportunity to speculate along with the characters about the killer’s identity and motives.

More so than in any play presented at ACHS before, “Clue” was produced almost completely by its large crew of students. 

“Every single role is filled by a student; from stage manager to assistant director to set designer. It has been a lot of cooperative work,” said ACHS science teacher Coleman Bailey, who has guided the students through the processes of preparing themselves and the ACHS minitheater for the play.

The role of the stoic butler, made famous by Tim Curry, will be played by Eric Abrams, who explained that the motivation to take on such a large role was motivated by a recently developed love for the stage.

“I never really had much enthusiasm at first, because I would always be scared to get up in front of a crowd, but then, in eighth grade, we did a short play for the talent show, and that got me more okay with getting up in front of people,” Abrams said. “That got me more interested and wanting to do more. It got me away from the whole shyness, so I can be in front of a classroom and not be shaking.” 

According to Abrams, this season’s production will engage the audience by enveloping them in the set, a feat the students accomplished by incorporating the entire theater into the play.

“It is totally different from any other play we have done here. We are not just using the stage, we are using the whole minitheater,” Abrams said.

Anyone who remembers playing (or still plays) Clue, will remember that the board is comprised of numerous rooms, all of which will need to be represented on stage in order to tell the tale. Here, the ACHS thespians had the benefit of a dedicated artist in Stevy Leininger, who has brought her talent to the set each and every evening for months to prepare the rooms of Mr. Body’s mansion for the play.

“I have been in here every day. We are kind of crunching right now, to get everything done, so I will probably start coming in on weekends too to get everything ready for the play,” said Leininger, who noted that she did not regret the many hours spent preparing the stage for opening day. “I love to paint. It is just something I love to do. Art is my thing. It is what I want to major in.” 

According to Leininger, she and her team of painters have prepared seven separate mini-sets for the play, including the library, study, kitchen, lounge, billiard room, bar and even the outside of the house as an alternative entrance to the theater.

“We are going to give the audience the option to come in as though they are entering the house,” said Leininger. “It is definitely worth it. It is going to be really good.”

The sets were made possible, in part, thanks to materials provided by Avery Impact and Avery Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore, according to Bailey. A collection to support both charitable organizations will be taken up at each showing. 

To get a first-hand look at the elaborate plots and sets of the ACHS Drama Club’s production of “Clue,” come by ACHS at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, Nov. 15, 16 and 17, and at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 18. Admission for adults is $5. For children or students, entry to the transformed theater is $3.