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Don Baker reads three resolutions for the approval of the Avery County GOP Executive
Committee.
Photo by Matthew Hundley



Originally published: 2013-01-30 17:10:22
Last modified: 2013-01-30 17:10:22

GOP Executive Committee approves resolutions

At the regular meeting of Avery County Board of Commissioners on Monday, Feb. 4, the commissioners will have the opportunity to address issues raised in two resolutions drafted and approved by the Avery County GOP Executive Committee.

At a special meeting of Avery County GOP Executive Committee on Thursday, Jan. 24, delegates from communities in Avery County gathered and approved three separate resolutions, two of which were directed to Avery County Board of Commissioners and were drafted by Don Baker, committee chairman. The third resolution was directed to Gov. Pat McCrory, House Speaker Thom Tillis and Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger objecting to the establishment of a state/federal healthcare exchange in North Carolina.

The two resolutions drafted by Baker are intended to be presented to Avery County Board of Commissioners at its regularly scheduled meeting on Monday, Feb. 4, and address two separate issues: the use of the former Banner Elk Elementary School and the attendance of board members at meetings.

In that meeting, the commissioners will have the opportunity to address the assertions of each resolution. 

In the resolution regarding the former Banner Elk Elementary School, the committee calls for the commissioners to “consider selling the Banner Elk Elementary School and property and use the proceeds to cover some of the cost of the new Banner Elk Elementary School.” The resolution refers to the proposed business incubator and the renovations required to the school as a “money pit.” 

The county’s plan to convert the old Banner Elk Elementary School building into a business incubator in an effort to create jobs and businesses in Avery County has been in motion for close to 18 months, during which time, the commissioners have discussed the ramifications and financial requirements for the endeavor through many meetings and the budgeting process. Given the amount of time and planning that has passed since the plans were put in place, Baker acknowledged in the Thursday meeting that it may be too late for the commissioners to change the course of the former school, but said that he felt that the committee should still voice its opinion. The resolution passed without dissent.

The second resolution “respectfully charges the Avery County Board of Commissioners to address this issue of absenteeism by one its boardmembers,” and asserts that “truancy is not responsible leadership and a practice that should not be followed by any person in any walk of life.” At the Feb. 4 meeting, the commissioners will have the opportunity to address the legal and administrative issues of attending meetings and/or voting via telecommuting.

To hear how the sitting commissioners confront the issues raised by the committee, all Avery residents can attend the public meeting of Avery County Board of Commissioners at 3:30 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 4. For a full account of the meeting, including responses from the commissioners during and after the meeting, look to next week’s issue of The Avery Journal-Times.